Photo 19 Oct 11,676 notes

(Source: neutrogena-george)

Video 19 Oct 16,110 notes

(Source: calvinkleenex)

Photo 19 Oct 368 notes jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.
As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.
Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.
That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.
And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.

As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.

Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.

That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.

And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

Quote 17 Oct 595 notes
Empathy isn’t just something that happens to us—a meteor shower of synapses firing across the brain—it’s also a choice we make: to pay attention, to extend ourselves. It’s made of exertion, that dowdier cousin of impulse. Sometimes we care for another because we know we should, or because it’s asked for, but this doesn’t make our caring hollow. The act of choosing simply means we’ve committed ourselves to a set of behaviors greater than the sum of our individual inclinations: I will listen to his sadness, even when I’m deep in my own. To say “going through the motions”—this isn’t reduction so much as acknowledgment of the effort—the labor, the motions, the dance—of getting inside another person’s state of heart or mind.

This confession of effort chafes against the notion that empathy should always arise unbidden, that genuine means the same thing as unwilled, that intentionality is the enemy of love. But I believe in intention and I believe in work. I believe in waking up in the middle of the night and packing our bags and leaving our worst selves for our better ones.
— Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams (via wordsnquotes)
Quote 17 Oct 25 notes
In hearing unknown new music, surprise and excitement are most important. Music is not a static art: it is constantly born anew.
— Confronting Silence, Toru Takemitsu (via annamoffo)
Quote 16 Oct 1,866 notes
If it looks real and feels real, do you think it matters if it’s real?
— Daniel Nayeri, Another Faust (via wordsnquotes)
Photo 16 Oct 778 notes linxspiration:

Idris Elba.

linxspiration:

Idris Elba.

Video 16 Oct 119,784 notes

Fuck Yeah Women of Color

Photo 15 Oct 259 notes dreamsinthyme:

… dismiss whatever insults your own soul …

dreamsinthyme:

… dismiss whatever insults your own soul …

Quote 15 Oct 2,385 notes
Your soul is the whole world.
— Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha (via larmoyante)

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